Parkour Parks

Parkour Parks

Spots to train all day. And where to find them!

With the popularity of Parkour blooming, Hertfordshire council has taken the necessary steps to ensure the community's growth will have public land to train on. The council in Hertfordshire must understand the incredibly positive power Parkour has to self motivate an individual and as such they have spent a large amount of their recreational community budget on building these Parkour parks. I can speak for the Parkour community when I say, thank you very much; these three Parkour-Parks all have different challenges and attributes to offer people of many different styles/skill levels and have already given the community much joy.

If you are a beginner or even a veteran I thoroughly recommend getting yourself over to one of these parks, the creativity in each park is practically limitless given the nature of Parkour being the projection of one's imagination upon an area and expressing themselves with movement. Then to have obstacles of all shapes and sizes clustered together in such a way that you can work out singular moves on many different objects, and then multiply that with combination's, leaves an abundance of possibilities within these tailored environments.

Also each person approaches an area with different ideas based on their imagination, a good example of this is showcased in Liam Ellis's:
"Outdoor Park"

Location, Location, Location

Mill End
36 Shepherds Ln, Mill End, Rickmansworth WD3 8JN

Croxley
311 Baldwins Ln, Croxley Green, Rickmansworth WD3 3LA

Leavesden(Yet to be finished)
57 Langley Ln, Abbots Langley WD5 0LX

Each park, as a set area for the Parkour community to train regularly, has the opportunity for practitioners to create video content and share their challenges/achievements with each other to learn and grow together.
Croxley Parkour park for instance has a Facebook page
"www.facebook.com/Croxley-Parkour-Park/"
which is being used for this exact purpose as well as discussing techniques/ideas associated with Parkour.

One of the videos uploaded to this community Facebook page that showcase a good range of said techniques is "Swingy Stuff"

The people involved with designing/building these parks were primarily the company Freemove who worked with Parkour Generations to consult local practitioners on which designs they found favourable and Three Rivers Council to fund the project.
Reaching out to your local council is always a solid first step to gaining community assets like these parks and we at London School of Parkour encourage you to follow the lead of the Hertfordshire Parkour community by arranging a meeting with a local council representative if you would like a local Parkour park in your county.

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About the Author

Connor O'Carroll

Connor O'Carroll

With many years studying technique and safe practice of Parkour, Connor utilizes these to focus on creative movement using simple surroundings for his own training.

He hopes to be able to share this method of creative expression to his students to see them too enjoy movement even if only given one unassuming obstacle.